Thursday November 5, 2009 | School Library System in America

November 4, 2009 at 9:57 am | Posted in Coming Up | 7 Comments

Schools are the center of learning in our country and the school library is at the epicenter of the learning experience in our schools. The American Association of School Libraries comes to Charlotte for an annual conference and we’ll meet some of the leaders of a group that represents 77,000 school libraries and over 62,000 certified media specialists. We’ll learn some of the history of the school library as well as how they’ve changed over the history of our education system, how they are keeping up with technology and how they’ve weathered challenges to some of the material they carry. We’ll hear all about school libraries.
Guests
Cassandra Barnett
– President, American Association of School Libraries
Deb Christensen – President, North Carolina School Library Media Association
Gerry Solomon – School Library Media Consultant, NC Dept. of Public Instruction

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  1. I graduated from Myers Park High in Charlotte. While I was an active user of an outstanding school library in elementary school, and to a certain extent middle school, the library in high school was worthless and did nothing but take up space. The librarians and school administration actively fought student use of the libraries — if a student was in the library during the day he was probably skipping class. And one could not use the library during lunch or after school without a pass signed from a teacher. As a result, no one used the library and the function of the librarian was to be Hermann Goering in drag if they suspected that a student was using the library productively. If Myers Park wanted to have a better commitment to its library and students, it should hire librarians who are willing to stay until 9:00 pm, and perhaps be a little less fascistic in suspecting the motives of the students who show up to use it. It’s tragic that such a great space went to waste. It just goes to show that the first priority at most schools is maintaining discipline and the second is high-quality academics. I hope that Myers Park is an exception to the rule.

  2. […] original here:  Thursday November 5, 2009 | School Library System in America … By admin | category: school library | tags: annual-conference, charlotte, epicenter, […]

  3. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Charlotte Talks, Charlotte Talks. Charlotte Talks said: School libraries. At the center of the American educational experience, a look at the future of school libraries, Thursday http://ow.ly/za7L […]

  4. As a former high school teacher, I do not think schools should rely so much on computers until there are enough computers in classrooms for EVERY student has access all the time. I found that with ccomputer labs and – maybe – one computer in a classroom, work could not be done in a timely, thorough or efficient manner. We also cannot assume that all children have access to technology away from school.

  5. I speak Spanish and I want my son to be bilingual. the local libraries don’t have enough material, specially videos and cds in Spanish. Well, the charlotte library does not borrow CDs or Videos because Charlotte libraries does not led CDs or videos. We don’t have enough time to isolate ourself to read while we can speed up with audiovisual media.

    How effective is that I can have 10 interlibrary loans(books) that I won’t read because I can’t make the time for it than borrowing instead an audio book, video or software that will teach me the skill in one hour.

    Seems like we forget what is the most important function of the library.

    What can be done!

    Emilio

  6. Correcting recent e-mail: starting on second line.

    …until there are enough computers in classrooms for every student to have access all the time.

  7. Charlotte libraries only borrow books not audio visual only books!

    Emilio


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