Wednesday September 16, 2009 | Mega Regions: Piedmont Atlantic

September 14, 2009 at 1:39 pm | Posted in Coming Up | 5 Comments

Growth and development is a constant issue in Charlotte but it’s far larger than most people realize. Experts say there is a mega-region emerging that stretches from Birmingham Alabama to Richmond Virginia and Charlotte is at the core of this area of vast growth. Mayor Pat McCrory is teaming up with Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin to explore the challenges and opportunities of being a part of a mega-region. McCrory and a panel of experts join us to discuss the mega-region in our midst.
Guests
Pat McCrory
Mayor of Charlotte
Tim Gulden – Co-Author of The Rise of the Mega-Region
Debra Campbell – Planning Director, Charlotte Mecklenburg Planning Department
Dr. Catherine Ross – Professor and Director of Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development at Georgia Tech

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  1. […] Wednesday September 16 | Mega Regions: Piedmont Atlantic « Charlotte Blogs charlotteblogs.wordpress.com/2009/09/14/wednesday-september-16-2009-mega-regions-piedmont-atlantic-region – view page – cached Growth and development is a constant issue in Charlotte but it’s far larger than most people realize. Experts say there is a mega-region emerging that stretches from Birmingham Alabama to Richmond Virginia and Charlotte is at the core of this area of vast growth. Mayor Pat McCrory is teaming up with Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin to explore the challenges and opportunities of being a part of a mega-region. McCrory and a panel of experts join us to discuss the mega-region in our midst. — From the page […]

  2. Can you please ask your guests what contact they’ve had with the “lower” end of this mega-region…in and around Birmingham? I used to live and work in the area, and would love to know that they now consider themselves as part of a region that’s not as insular as usual, and that they might align themselves with the more progressive mid-Atlantic region, as opposed to with the traditional “deep south crescent” (of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana).

  3. One of the major regional transportation problems is our highway construction – we build interstates with far to many exits and far too poor surface roads so that local people use interstates for 2 mile trips – I485 is the best recent example and now in Cornelius a group wants to add an exit 27 (there is already 25 and 28) to service one development – far better to improve US 21 and build a similar connector west of I-77.

    • Counter to logic, it’s not so much the actual number of interstate exits that causes the congestion, Bill. It has more to do with the lack of “smart control” features on those entrance ramps–along with the second item you note (the lack of enough or properly sized and located surface streets)–that make our freeways seem so congested.

      There are many regions of the country where freeways have many more exits than one-per-mile…and that are not as congested as ours sometimes are. I-77 could handle a new exit between 25 and 28…but the supporting infrastructure isn’t yet set up to allow it to be successful. In the long run, that (alongside HOT lanes, expanded number of lanes, entrance controls, and other improvements that are used elsewhere) will have to be addressed before we see much benefit.

  4. It seems to me that the discussion ought to have included the major port-city in our ‘megaregion,’ namely Charleston, SC. No region can become truly notable or powerful unless it has a major arterial connection to the outside world.

    The deep-water port of Charleston, SC should be reactivated to become THE major port of the Southeastern Atlantic seaboard states; we should revitalize Charleston, SC so that we here in the Carolinas do not have to continue to rely on other far-away major ports in New Orleans, Norfolk, Houston, etc.


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