Tuesday December 14, 2010 | South Carolina Secession Story

December 13, 2010 at 11:39 am | Posted in Coming Up | 6 Comments

Today’s guest argues that a South Carolina document helped launch the civil war and continues to have unintended consequences for the Palmetto State. On December 20th, 1860 South Carolina’s leaders ratified an article of secession. Dr. Eric Emerson calls the article of secession the most important document in South Carolina’s history and that the state, and the nation, continue to feel the ripples from that moment in history. We’ll talk with Dr. Emerson about the upcoming 150th commemoration of that historic event and what it means for South Carolina’s citizens.

Guest
Dr. Eric Emerson
– Director, South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History

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  1. Mike, hope you watch this before the show: http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/thu-december-9-2010/the-south-s-secession-commemoration?xrs=synd_facebook

  2. I had never seen the sign that’s in the photo on your website, which offers “reverence” and “admiration” for the signers of the SC ordinance of secession and praises their “courage” and “integrity.” The former term is usually associated with what the Christian religion offers to God–does this kind of ancestor worship still dominate the debate in SC and doesn’t that make rational analysis by historians extremely difficult? The sign seems to carry the official logo of the state of SC, the palmetto and the crescent. I wonder how SC’s black citizens feel about all this praise being lavished in the state’s name on the secessionists?

  3. How is it that so many of these people who celebrate the secession are the same people who claim to be so patriotic? Secession was intended to destroy the “United” in United States. Seems like treason to me.

  4. Does your guest have any idea if SC was receiving Federal aid back then? It seems to me all the states that were talking secession last year get the most Federal aid. Thank you.

  5. 3 quick points, if as Clauswitcz states- “War is politics by other means”
    1)Why would anyone celeberate the worst political decision in 600 years on this continent?
    2) If it was about “States Rights” please name one right, besides slavery the South would fight for?
    3) IF you want tolook at what whould have happened had they won,look to central america, lots of little states witht eh same language,by the wars end, Georgia and other states wanted to secede from the CSA. and of course they would have in due course

  6. @Terry McDonald – The idea of States Rights was not about slavery or some specific rights in total but the idea that each state had the right to govern itself as a “check and balance” of the federal government. The states wanted to limit the power of federal government and make sure they still had the right act independently. They wanted the states to have the right to decide if they were willing to accept certain federal acts.

    This bore the idea of nullification, where the states would have the right to decide and rule federal acts unconstitutional. The federal government denied states this right. When this happened it started the talk toward states option to secede.

    It is a matter of opinion that this was the worst political decision in 600 years. Does the federal government today have too much power? Is government too big for it’s own good? What is the overall check and balance or the federal government?


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